FREE Lenten Journal 2019

That’s right! The FREE Lenten Journal for 2019 is here and ready for you to print and download. I’m so excited to share this one with you. I’ve made some formatting changes from previous seasonal journals to hopefully ease the print-load on your end.

Unlike Advent last year, I’ve only done one journal for Lent. This is the lectio divina based journal where each day I’ve prayerfully chosen one verse or passage from the daily readings for your prayer and reflection. For those who don’t know or aren’t familiar, lectio divina is an ancient way of praying the Scriptures. You select a verse to meditate on, reading it aloud a few times and letting the words really sink into you. Often, a single word or phrase will stand out in a particular way, drawing your attention to it. Spend a few more minutes pondering what God is speaking to you through this word, then respond in prayer to that message. Maybe God is challenging you to rethink a situation, or is offering you comfort during a difficulty. Perhaps He is revealing His generosity or the greatness of His mercy. After you respond in prayer, sit in silence and adoration, basking in the love God has for you.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/40e41uogel0i3uy/2019%20Lent%20Lectio%20Divina%20Journal.pdf?dl=0
Click on the image or the link above to access the pdf file. You do not need a dropbox account to access the file.

Lectio Divina is a beautiful way to slow down during your day and to spend intentional time with the Lord. The word or phrase you encountered during your prayer could serve as a mantra or focus for your day, something you continue to meditate on even after your dedicated lectio time is over.

Please, please share this post with everyone and anyone you think would like to have a quality, solid and free Lenten resource. There are so many options out there, but not many of them are so easily or readily accessible.

I would also love to hear your thoughts on this journal. If you happen to have downloaded my journals in the past, it would be great to hear how you felt this one compared to the others. Feel free to email me (in my profile bio along the side), comment below or reach out on social media. Here’s that link one more time.


In related news, I think I’ve found my word that will be guiding my Lenten season. My word for 2019 is officially “Follow-Through” and I’ve been working hard on embodying that. Responding to emails in a timely way, remembering to return library books on time, actually getting out of bed when my alarm goes off (mostly, this one is so hard people, seriously). I’m certainly not perfect, but I’m feeling better already about myself and in my self-respect.

Inspired by this, my word for Lent is going to be “Presence.” Part of following through on things is making sure I’m ready and able to be present when and where I need to be. If I promise to be at someone’s house for a playdate at 10, then in order to follow through on that I need to have the presence of mind that morning to leave the house at the right time. I can’t be worrying about yesterday, fussing about tomorrow, or getting caught up in too many tasks. Follow through also means my actual presence is usually required in some matter for something. Emails won’t write themselves. Library books don’t walk back to the library for me (wouldn’t that be awesome!) In order to follow through, I need to be present to that situation.

So, the way I’m going to practice being fully present is by not yelling through the house for my kids. And this is going to be really tough because we have a long, winding house which, long story, used to be two houses that are now joined in the middle. It’s super fun but also challenging when the person you need is on the other side of the house. Instead of shouting for that person, (which is usually followed by the unfair chastisement that they ought to come talk to me instead of shouting through the house….like I just did), I’m going to get up, or pause what I’m doing, and go seek that child out. I’ll make eye contact, speak calmly and have a moment of true presence with them. At least, I hope. A fast from yelling, I’m not sure how it will go, but I think it’s worth a try. I’m still working on how my word of “Presence” will factor into prayer and almsgiving, but there’s still some time yet.

What are you hoping for this Lent? Will you try the word or phrase idea for focusing your Lenten practices?

Daily Graces. kktaliaferro.wordpress.com

Chosen, not Qualified

Our base parish has been so thankful these past two weeks. Last April, our active duty priest assigned to our base retired and we have been without an assigned priest since then. A very kind priest from town has been coming to help fill in, but has to basically fly in, say Mass and then zoom straight back to his parish to make the times work. We were grateful for the gift of the Sacrament, but there wasn’t much time for pastoral care. After much prayer, a civilian priest volunteered to come fill the void and his homilies the past two weeks have been very, very good.

His main point this week was so good, I had to take a minute and share it with you all. He asked us a question at the start: “In all our readings today, there was a man before God. Was he chosen, though unqualified for the work? Or was he qualified, and then chosen?” The answer, of course, is that Isaiah, Paul and Peter were all chosen by God for extraordinary work, but at the time of their calling they were unqualified, unworthy or unclean in some way. They did not have perfect track records (remember Paul’s persecution of the early Christians). They were not holy men (Isaiah said he was a man of unclean lips living among people with unclean lips). They were not righteous men, living ascetic lives in the desert (Peter calls himself a sinful man and works as a lowly fisherman).

What makes these men great is their engagement in their call. Each one was called, and though knowingly unworthy, each responded in some way. Their response is what propels them along the path of grace which God had laid out for them. It changed them, moulded them into individuals uniquely qualified for the role God had called them too.

Isaiah’s lips were purified with the burning coal so that he could be a prophet to a people desperate for God’s presence. Paul credits his complete 180 to the grace working in and through him. Peter hear’s Jesus command to lower the nets and even in his doubt he is obedient. Through that obedience, a catch so large nearly capsized his boat.

What does it mean for you and I? It means that we all have been chosen for some work in this world. It also means that we probably aren’t qualified fully for it. None of us are perfect, we all have places of brokenness, fear, doubt, anger, etc. But those are exactly the places that God wants to work on, to improve, to qualify, so that we can fulfill His mission for us. We are each a unique chosen son and daughter of the Almighty, and nothing can take that away.

I, personally, see this especially in parenthood. These children that have been placed in my lap were chosen for my husband and I to raise. More often than not we feel hugely unqualified for this position. Books upon books upon blogs upon podcasts will try to tell you that you are qualified, that you’ve read all the answers, and it’s just not true. Because your children were not handed to you and your spouse unattached. They belong to God, and He is raising them right along with you. He chose you for them, unqualified though you are. When we lean into the grace He provides we discover the way forward which we couldn’t have found on our own.

So on the days you are feeling less than qualified for the work God has placed at your feet, take comfort and inspiration from Isaiah, Paul and Peter. They may not have been qualified, but they were willing. Are you willing to take the next step into your calling as a chosen son or daughter of the Father?

Catholicmom.com – A Word for Lent

I know, Lent is still a little more than a month away. Don’t get me wrong, Ordinary Time is definitely important and usually anything but ordinary, but I’m considering a new approach to Lent this year that I wanted to share. A few weeks ago, I posted on my own blog about choosing a word or theme for the new year, rather than making resolutions. I am taking that same concept and want to offer it as a new way to approach Lent.

We all know Lent is coming. We usually remember that means a time for fasting, almsgiving, and prayer. How many of us take dedicated time to discern what we are going to “give up” or “do more of?” I’ll be completely honest here: Usually I finalize my Lenten plans on or slightly before Ash Wednesday. And typically, they are things that I know are going to be good for me, but I haven’t given them a whole lot of thought. It’s the low-hanging fruit — say a Rosary a day, give up snacks between meals, read a Psalm every day, give $5 extra at Mass, and so on. All good things, but maybe not the most challenging or even the most personal for my spiritual life….

To continue reading, please head over to Catholicmom.com

Daily Graces. kktaliaferro.wordpress.com